Why A WWI Vet's Daughter Cherishes This Golden Crucifix 100 Years Later

November 12, 2018 - 11:59 am
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By Neil A. Carousso

PORT JEFFERSON, N.Y. (WCBS 880) -- It’s called the forgotten war, but a hero’s daughter will never forget the sacrifices of her father, Private First Class Walter E. Decker, during his time in the Army in World War I. A special golden crucifix passed on to her keeps him first place.

"I was close to my dad growing up, and I always remembered in the summer, he'd be wearing these long johns, and the tissue on his skin was so thin, that he'd bleed through,” said Carol Fazio, 77, of her father. “He suffered ‘til the day he died from mustard gas.”

Decker’s hand-written discharge papers notes he was gassed on October 15, 1918 while serving in France for just under 10 months. 

He entered the service at 16, just before his 17th birthday, after his father died. He mailed each of his allotment checks to his mother.

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“He was a communication expert. His company would go up to see the enemy and to send back [intelligence] to his troops,” said Fazio. "On the way back, that's when the enemy got them and shot them.”

German troops attacked Unit Company B in the 303rd Field Signal Battalion of the 78th Infantry Division in the French forests with mustard gas.

“My father was left for dead. They thought he was dead,” Fazio said, adding several of his cohorts were killed.

Decker was 20 at the time of the gas attack. He died in 1980 at the age of 82. He is buried at Calverton National Cemetery on Long Island where local soldiers from all the wars are buried with their spouses.

Private First Class Decker received the Purple Heart in the first year the award was instituted, 1932, on the bicentennial of George Washington’s birth.

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He also received the Distinguished Service Cross – the second highest decoration for valor.

But it is a different cross passing through the generations that's revered by Decker’s daughter.

“At the time, the French monks used to go through the forest when they knew it was safe and call out to find out anybody who was alive. And, they heard my father, and what they did was they placed this cross on each of the bodies that were ready to go back, back to a hospital,” said Fazio while holding the golden crucifix.

Fazio just learned of the cross last year when she visited her niece and nephew in Wilmington, North Carolina. The cross made its way to Decker’s step-son Daniel who was a Marine, and then, Daniel’s brother Alfred when he died. The family wanted Carol to have it, as she is Decker’s biological daughter.

“I had no idea. It was really overwhelming, it really was, to think I was holding something that was 100 years and it stood on my father in the forest,” Fazio said.

When Carol was growing up, it was common for disabled veterans to be at her house. Decker was active in the Disabled American Veterans Charity (DAV) after leaving the Army and would visit wounded soldiers at the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) and Veterans Affairs facilities.

“My father would walk them through it,” said Fazio who saw her father as a caregiver, serving throughout his lifetime.

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Like many WWI veterans, Decker did not talk about his service, what he saw overseas or the gas attack in France that left him suffering until the day he died. The stories were passed on through family members who gleaned information over time.

"One thing I asked him about the war and about his involvement, everything with the VFW, I asked him, if he had to do it all over again,” said Fazio. “I said to him, 'Dad, would you do that?' I said, 'Would you go into the service?' And he said, 'Without a doubt.'"