'Hero of Cologne' receives bronze star during surprise ceremony

Army.mil
September 20, 2019 - 8:23 am
Army Maj. Peter Semanoff salutes World War II veteran Clarence Smoyer

US Army

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By Thomas Brading, Army News Service

WASHINGTON -- One of the most celebrated World War II tank gunners received the bronze star Wednesday, during a surprise award ceremony 74-years in the making. 

Clarence Smoyer, 96-year-old former 3rd Armored Division tank gunner, never bragged about the five tanks he destroyed in the war, including an infamous Nazi tank he leveled during a dramatic duel in war-torn Cologne, Germany. 

He didn't ask for anything, either. To Smoyer, he was just doing his job to protect the men he considers family. 

DUEL AT THE CATHEDRAL 

Clarence Smoyer (top middle) was a 21-year-old Pennsylvania native


It was March 6, 1945, and WWII was winding down, much of Germany was left in ruins. 

Cologne, one of the country's largest cities, was no exception. Once a bustling metropolis, Cologne had been reduced to rubble, with only a few identifiable buildings remaining -- including its cathedral. 

As the Americans entered Cologne, Smoyer recalls the now-infamous words of his lieutenant, Bill Stillman, who said, "Gentlemen, I give you Cologne, let's knock the hell out of it."

"So… we obliged," Smoyer joked, thinking back to that day. 

American forces, before making their way east toward Berlin, had to conquer Cologne first. Their goal was to secure a bridge over the Rhine River, but a nearby Nazi tank had other plans. 

"Attacking such a large city gave the enemy plenty of places to hide," Smoyer said. "Not just in the horizontal plane, but from the basements to the tops of five-story buildings -- Cologne put us to the test."

"We were chosen as the first tank(s) into the city," he added. "Everyone else followed us in. So, for us, it was constant firing. You fired at anything that moved. That's when a gunner's instinct kicked in."

One street over from Smoyer, the Panther tank, used by the Nazis, took out an American Sherman tank, killing three Soldiers inside, including Karl Kellner. The Wisconsin native, and Silver Star recipient, had received a battlefield commission to lieutenant just two weeks prior. 

After being hit, Kellner's leg was amputated at the knee. He jumped from the tank and landed on his remaining leg. Smoke lifted from his stump like a ghost fading into the air, witnessed remembered.

Nearby, Stars and Stripes reporter, Sgt. Andy Rooney -- the future acclaimed television journalist -- along with another man sprinted toward Kellner. He was lying near the destroyed American tank. They moved him to onto a jumble of debris, safely out of the way, and attempted to stop the blood as it flowed from Kellner's severed limb. 

Rooney, the future 60 Minutes newsman, held Kellner in his arms as he died. Later, Rooney would say it was the first time he witnessed death. The other two tankers, both killed by the Germans, never escaped the Sherman tank. Meanwhile, Smoyer and his crew were slowly approaching the battle. 

The Panther tank idled quietly in the street, as the Americans approached.

"Experience taught me it's impossible to knock out a German tank in one shot," he said. "So, I worked a plan with our driver. He was to edge into the intersection, I'd shoot, and then he'd back up -- fast! When we roared into the intersection to shoot, everything went out the window."

Instead of "seeing the flank of the Panther in the periscope," like he planned, Smoyer looked at the Panther's super velocity muzzle pointed at street level, right at him, he said. 

Smoyer added "his heart stopped." The driver, also staring down the barrel of the German's muzzle, panicked and "floored the gas." 

"We were totally vulnerable," Smoyer said. "I snapped off a quick shot and hit him first. I kept yelling for (armor-piercing) rounds and kept hitting him until he caught fire. I could hardly breathe as we backed out of there."

Smoyer's finger squeezed the trigger of his tank, and he fired 90mm rounds into the side of the Panther tank, garnishing three direct hits. 

"People always ask why I fired three times," Smoyer said. "Some say I was butchering that German crew by not giving them a chance to flee the tank. Any crewman still alive in that Panther could have pulled the trigger and with that powerful of a gun still pointing at us, we'd all be dead."

But, that wasn't the case. The Americans won, and Smoyer, the thin, 21-year-old curly blonde haired corporal, earned the nickname "the hero of Cologne."

Footage of the battle, captured by Tech. Sgt. Jim Bates, a combat cameraman attached to the 165th Photo Signal Company, made its way into movie newsreels worldwide, including back home in Pennsylvania, where Smoyer called home. 

"That's Hon!" Smoyer's sister-in-law yelled during an airing of the newsreel, Hon was Smoyer's family nickname. 

She later convinced the theater owners to replay the reel, so Smoyer's parents, who had never been to a movie theater, could see their son was still alive. 

74 YEARS IN THE MAKING

Veterans Clarence Smoyer and Joe Caserta stand near a Pershing tank


For his actions that day, Smoyer was notified he earned the Bronze Star. However, this was short-lived after Smoyer talked to German children, who were begging the Soldier for bubble gum. This small act of charity cost him the medal. 

"They wanted bubble gum and I was still searching my pockets when a jeep full of (military police) turned the corner," Smoyer said. "Fraternization was a no-no."

Smoyer added, he felt bad for the kids, who had been on the frontlines of war longer than him. The MPs took his name, tank, serial number, and indirectly, his Bronze Star. 

"I could have avoided all that if I just had a stick of gum!" He joked. 

But, it was never about the medals and glory. As decades passed, the war ended, and Smoyer returned to civilian life. His neighbors in Allentown, Pennsylvania, never knew they lived by a war hero. 

That all changed after an author, Adam Makos, who wrote a book on Smoyer's story, happened upon information that changed everything. 

"Smoyer's tank commander and an Army combat cameraman both received Bronze Stars for their actions that day -- yet, Smoyer got nothing," Makos said. 

This inspired the author to change that. He used witnesses to Smoyer's actions, evidence he collected, including Bates combat camera footage, and contacted the Army.

In the end, a military review board agreed with Makos, and Smoyer was awarded the Bronze Star. Three additional Bronze Stars were also awarded to the rest of the tank crew, making Smoyer's tank crew "one of the most celebrated in Army history," according to Makos. 

World War II veterans Joe Caserta and Clarence Smoyer embrace


To keep the surprise, Smoyer's loved ones convinced him he was visiting the WWII Memorial as a tourist. The monument was filled with Soldiers, fellow WWII veterans, news crews, and onlookers. Then, overwhelmed with emotion, he received the long overdue medal. 

With the Bronze Star pinned to his chest, Smoyer promised to, "Wear the medal to remember the ones who lost their lives" that day, nearly 75 years ago.

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