Best Warrior Competition moves to Wisconsin amid COVID-19

Connecting Vets
September 08, 2020 - 8:25 am
Warrior

Spc. Olivia Cowart

By Spc. Olivia Cowart

The U.S. Army Reserve’s Best Warrior Competition is an intense and brutal challenge for only the most skilled soldiers. Competitors put their warrior skills to the test across more than a dozen demanding events, including weapons qualification, a 12-mile ruck march, and ambush scenarios. A competition of this caliber is nothing without the experienced noncommissioned officers providing the ammo for the weapons qualification, mapping the route for the ruck march, coordinating the UH-60 Black Hawk landing zones, and more. This team of leaders is determined to carry on the tradition of the Best Warrior Competition against all odds, even if it means moving the competition across the country in the wake of a global pandemic. 

“I feel like the Army Reserve had our back and we essentially have each other's back,” said Master Sgt. Ryan Cameron, lead organizer and cadre noncommissioned officer-in-charge of this year’s competition. “We said we're going to do this boots on ground competition. And everybody said yes, let's do it. And they got behind us.” 

Cameron’s first experience with the competition was back in 2014. His passion for the competition has grown over the years, along with his role in supporting and planning it. Throughout its 18 years of testing Army Reserve soldiers, Best Warrior in its recent years has been held a Fort Bragg, North Carolina. But when the COVID-19 crisis worsened, Cameron knew that he needed to create a new plan of action.

Annual DoD Warrior Games cancelled amid COVID-19 concerns

In early April,, he and his colleagues created a decision matrix of five different directions the competition could take. It was originally scheduled for June, and one plan included staying at Fort Bragg and rescheduling the competition to August. Cameron’s leadership approved this plan, allowing the competition to carry on. 

“We got closer to that date,” said Cameron, “and we noticed that everything that we were doing was still being affected by our current situation ... COVID-19.” 

The Iron Mike Conference Center at Fort Bragg, the site of the awards luncheon, wasn’t available to host more than 10 people until Sept. 1, and they weren't sure if that timeline would be extended, Cameron said. Even worse, Fort Bragg started to enhance their social distancing and quarantine measures, to include a 14-day quarantine for anyone who flew commercially there. Cameron knew there wasn’t enough time or resources to accommodate this restriction, and he would risk downsizing his staff. 

“If we lose all that support staff that is getting on ground, we're risking safety for the competitors,” Cameron said. “We're risking the competition and everything that we're working for.” 

Cameron went on a search for another location and coordinated a trip to Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, to see if it could be the next location for the Best Warrior Competition.

There, he met with an old Army colleague, the Fort McCoy garrison senior enlisted advisor, Command Sgt. Maj. Paul Mantha. “I know that he's very passionate about the Army Reserve and loves Best Warrior,” said Cameron. “He's checked on us, and given us every single thing that we asked for.” 

PHOTOS from the 2019 DoD Best Warrior competition

“We were just very honored as a community and as installation … that Fort McCoy was chosen for the Best Warrior Competition,” said Mantha. “This is an Army Reserve installation. This is an Army Reserve competition.” 

Mantha provided support to the competition in the past as the command sergeant major of the Forces Command, U.S. Army Reserve Command, Special Troops Battalion there at Fort Bragg, and was well-acquainted with the process of planning the event. Mantha said he knew that Fort McCoy’s COVID-19 cases were low, and that they had ample boarding, ranges, and training space in order to meet the requirements of the competition safely. 

Throughout the planning and execution stages, Cameron and Mantha took every precaution to minimize the risk of COVID-19 exposure for their soldiers, staff, and civilian workforce. They were dedicated to hosting a “boots on ground competition,” but without compromising safety. 

Despite the pandemic, there is a strong tradition behind the Best Warrior Competition that fostered the drive to continue this year. That drive has led to Cameron and his team working around the clock to prepare for the start of the competition, Sept. 4, with some having arrived as early as Aug. 19 to prepare. 

“There's a ton of soldiers that look forward to this every year,” Cameron said. “That's one of those things that if you take a year off, you are risking losing that drive and that passion.” 

This competition is more than finding out who the best warrior is. It is an opportunity for soldiers to participate, train, and learn, Cameron said. The competitors have the opportunity to work on their warrior skills, and the support staff gets to conduct their training mission with a high-profile event. 

“Despite the coronavirus world pandemic happening, we’re going to prove that we can do it and do it better than we ever have,” Cameron said. “We have issues every year, but I can tell you that moving up here, I feel like this is going to be a better product than we had last year and the year before.”

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